High Park Fire

Monday, February 20, 2012

A few new Carp flies for the 2012 season.

I recently participated in my first fly swap with a bunch of gentlemen from around the web who are carpoholics like myself. Not knowing what to expect as this was my first fly swap, I stuck with a pattern I have tied up many many times; Jay Zimmermans Backstabber in purple and black. This pattern is buggy, easy to tie and the carp here in Northern Colorado really seem to love them as well.  I tie them up in purple and black, orange(really more rust) and brown, and pure white. The pure white must trick them into thinking the fly looks like a cottonwood seed that coats the lakes and ponds in the spring.
Check out Jay's Blog and how to tie up your own Backstabber at  http://coloradoflyfishingreports.blogspot.com/2010/06/best-flies-for-carp.html 
His site is an incredible treasure of tips and tricks and I highly recommend paying his site a visit.

Anyways.  I received my flies from  http://www.flycarpin.com/p/fly-carpin-2011-carp-fly-swap.html and all I can say is WOW!

Flies from the 2012 Carp fly swap.
Well after doing a quick study of the flies I received there tends to be a common theme to carp flies. Tie them so the hook point, put in some type of 'eye', tie them smaller than you think, expect if you fish in Michigan. That huge fly in the front belongs to Kevin at http://www.indigoguideservice.com/Guides/Kevin/.  Wow that thing is huge!

Looking at all the cool new flies got me thinking and I put together a few bugs based on what I saw in the fly swap.

 I really like these guys here.  A bit heaver eye in yellow and some Bobcat hair for the tail and dubbing.  Thin skin on the top to push those hackle feathers creating what look like legs.

 Getting into the soft hackle is something I have never done before but now that I look at it this is how I think the fly should appear.  I wonder if some marabou would work great here? This guys is really my favorite of the new bunch and I think I will use him often.
 I experimented with the thin skin on top, and below, with the thin skin at the 'bottom' of the fly to see how it would ride.


Although it appears that the thin skin on the bottom would make the fly legs more buggy near the hook point, I think I prefer the thin skin on the top.  Dang, I cant wait for the ice to break up and try these out on some real carp.
All this would have not been possible without the origination and perseverance of McTage at  http://www.flycarpin.com/p/fly-carpin-2011-carp-fly-swap.html   Thank mate, I appreciate it and look forward to the next fly swap.

Let me know what you think of the flies.
Lonny

12 comments:

  1. Lonny,

    Glad you received your flies. I'm still awaiting mine, tomorrow for sure! Hey, here is something I learned long ago that came to mind looking at your new own thought processes. After reading the iconic "Carp on the Fly", when it first came out almost, I set out to tie the flies contained within. I found out that Clouser's Swimming Nymph. a fly almost every carper uses, rode hook up tied as Barry did in the book and Bob C does himself. Well, very good if you want a hook up fly which all but my eggs and bread ties are, but that pretty wing case of peacock herl is hidden and seems to be a part that should not be left out. So I placed a 3/16" black (could have used an enameled orange or chartruese I see now) on a size 8 2X long hook tied inverted in the vise when it came to adding the case. Now the heavy hen hackle would not flip it over, which now I find is something to be careful of. Actually some still did so I trimmed hackle off the bottom if needed. Now my Clouser Swimmers ride upside down wingcase exposed, and I added rubber legs as well. It's a heavy lander for sure but preforms as I wish. Sean Hudson's Mud Bug is a great example. The trimmed hackle insure it rides well, I am a fan of that dude big time by the way.

    Nice post! Gregg

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  2. Hey Lonny, not many fish yet, pretty cold so nothing great to tell you from the weekend. Once it gets warmer and we start seeing fish I'll get a pic for you. We'll be in touch and I'll get it your way.

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    1. n.taylor, hey man it happens, but thank you for going out and trying the fly. Jay really created a winner with that one.

      Thank you.
      Lonny

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  3. To expand on what Gregg was talking about one of the things to think about with your thin-skin on top or bottom will be drag while the fly drops. Weight on top of bottom of the hook is just one of the factors in whether it goes hook up. Drag is just as important and you can actually end up with a total basket case of a fly if the weight (bouyancy really) wants to go one way and the drag the other. That is one reason why the marabou is on the hook-side in a backstabber - it is a parachute. Try dunking those flies in the sink or tub (with leader!) and moving them around a little before you decide thin-skin top or bottom.

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    1. Thank you McTage, I never really thought of buoyancy in my thought process. That really makes sense to factor in. The water has opened up here in Loveland and now I can get out and cast a few of these flies and see how they perform. I have a question about your Primordial Carp-Stew. Do you use a dubbing loop when making the body with the Rub a Dub? I really love that fly.
      Thank you for your comments.
      Lonny

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    2. Yes, the rub-a-dub is applied with a dubbing loop. It is not the easiest dubbing to load into a loop with but it comes out pretty cool. I think I am gonna do a long and totally geeky post at some point about the physics of how a fly drops through the column.

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    3. Oh I would love to read that post. Lets hope its able to come together for you.

      And thanks again for putting the fly swap together and thank you for viewing my blog.

      Lonny

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  4. Greg, thank you for the comments, I will try what you said about the Clouser Swimming nymph, as its one of the classic carp patterns. I always keep a few in my fly box but never use them as I am afraid of them getting snagged up in the weeds. I noticed you were an infantry and airborne soldier. I was in the 3rd ACR in the 80's and our job was to be a place holder in the Fulda Gap in Germany when the Russians decided they wanted to go for a drive across the county with tanks and apc's. We were to 'find and fix' the enemy, aka wave to the bad guys and let them shoot at you while the big guns came to your rescue.

    As always, thank you for your comments.
    Lonny

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  5. Lonny,

    Ha! Way off the subject, but I was Russian cannon fodder if they ever made it to Alaska, this in thew late 70's. There were 2 Airborne Co. in the state and I was in Fairbanks. Winter field problems, I stayed up there as a civilian but kept to the mantra, "I will NEVER complain about the heat again," and I don't. Erin keeps making me miss it up there.

    The Swimming Nymph simply must have correct weight to ride with the wingcase up. I've thought of tying them in the round, that is, the hackle wrapped over a herl thorax, but have not tried that. Heck, maybe it doesn't matter, except to me. But when I see other's ties I always wonder if they rise as desired, because I've made dozens that have not.

    Gregg

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  6. Hi Lonny, found your blog and followed. JGR

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    1. JGR, thanks for following. Appreciate it.
      Lonny

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